South Africa
Organic Rocks!
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Posted by Home School Nature Club, South Africa on 28 January 2017
Post related to Thirsty farming, Fresher Water
Organic Rocks
Organic Rocks

Organic Rocks! 

What an interesting excuse or should I say - (learning opportunity} to get all muddy, stinky and dirty, whilst having fun on our recent visit to a farm that makes organic compost! Climbing the gigantic compost heaps was definitely the highlight of the morning! How interesting to feel the warmth of the compost heaps and learning how this is formed and develop in the process of organic compost making!  Just to recap on the days learning and to share this valuable information to other Water explorers.  So, what is compost? It is organic plant material (Leaves, wood, cellulose, termites, microbes and fungi). What is needed to make compost? 1. Water - exchange of chemicals. 2. Air - oxygen and 3. Food - nutrients. When is it ready? 1. Sweet smell, earthy smell. 2. The organic material is decompossed. 3. Not slimy and smelly. How to compost? Fine product to be mixed into the soil for worms and microbes to use. Course Product - To be spread on top of the soil - retain moisture, - provide food for worms and other insects. What is the benefit? Improve moisture level in soil, add more air space and room for quick root growth help improve exchange of nutrients in the soil into the roots of the plant. So, the learners leant all the advantages of organic farming versus commercial farming.  Did you know that Marigolds and "kakiebos" are good natural pesticides than the commercialised pesticides and chemicals.  We also learned that garlic sprayed on to our vegetables are also a good alternative to commercial pesticides and chemicals.  Why not plant some Marigolds between your vegetables to keep all pests away!  We also discussed and learned that organic farming uses much less water than commercial farming and the type of bark that you make your compost from is also important in the absorption of water!  Well, our children from our Nature clubb are certainly inspired to be organic farmers and use organic farming techniques in their vegetable gardens at home!


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